WATCH: The Battle of Jutland Animation

4

A full account of the Battle of Jutland narrated by Admiral Jellicoe’s grandson as part of the Jutland Centenary Commemorations.

This 24 minute animation gives the viewer an overview of the major “chapters” of the battle – the opening battle cruiser action, the Grand Fleet deployment, the Turn Away and the Night Destroyer actions. Additionally the 1917 submarine campaign is explained as a consequence of Scheer’s decision not to risk another Fleet-to-Fleet encounter.

Graphics, animation, animated maps and contemporary photography illustrate key points. I thank Nick on Vimeo for sharing this video.

Battle of Jutland

Cut out from the Battle of Jutland animation.

The Battle of Jutland (which took place from 31 May until 1 June 1916) was the largest naval battle of the First World War. It was the only time that the British and German fleets of ‘dreadnought’ battleships actually came to blows.

The battle was a confused and bloody action involving 250 ships and around 100,000 men. The Germans damaged Beatty’s flagship, HMS Lion, and sank HMS Indefatigable and HMS Queen Mary, both of which blew up when German shells hit their ammunition magazines.

The British lost 14 ships and over 6,000 men. One of them is William Boyle from Glasgow who was killed in action, aged just 16, along with 1,018 other men when HMS Indefatigable was sunk during the Battle of Jutland in May 1916.

The Germans lost 11 ships and over 2,500 men, they also avoided complete destruction but never again seriously challenged British control of the North Sea.

Share.

About Author

Argunners Magazine is an independent online historian and collector's magazine, dedicated to the militaria and history of both Axis and Allied powers during the World War 1 & 2. Argunners is a central resource offering the latest militaria and war history news, journals, articles and press releases related to these themes.

4 Comments

  1. What an amazing experience to have taken part in a battle of that magnitude. It’s imconprehensible when you try to think of how it must have been. Wonderful animation, thanks for posting it. I’d love to see more like this. I remeber ad a boy at the ‘boys and girls’ exhibition in Bham watching a 4.5 hour replay of Waterloo using models on a 40′ square landscape. Even then it was amazing, I like to see thay done this way

Let us know what you think: