First Invasion Then Liberation: Norway in 1945

7

The German occupation of Norway began on 9 April 1940 after German forces invaded the neutral Scandinavian country of Norway.[1] It ended on 8 May 1945, after the capitulation of German forces in Europe. Throughout this period, Norway was continuously occupied by the Wehrmacht.

Civil rule was effectively assumed by the Reichskommissariat Norwegen (Reich Commissariat of Norway), which acted in collaboration with a pro-German puppet government, while the Norwegian King and legitimate government continued to operate in exile from London.

This period of military occupation is in Norway referred to as the “war years” or “occupation period”.

First Invasion Then Liberation: Norway in 1945

The_Liberation_of_Norway_BU6387

German troops evacuating Trondheim using local horse-drawn transport.

The_Liberation_of_Norway_BU6391

German mountain troops on the road after evacuating Oslo.

Norway_After_Liberation_1945_BU9776

German prisoners of war from Elverum camp being processed prior to embarkation from Norway to Germany. Here prisoners play cards to pass the time at the embarkation camp at Mandal prior to boarding boats for Germany.

Norway_After_Liberation_1945_BU9775

German prisoners of war being processed prior to embarkation from Norway to Germany. Here prisoners rest at the embarkation camp at Mandal prior to boarding boats for Germany.

Norway_After_Liberation_1945_BU9772

German prisoners of war at Elverum camp being processed prior to embarkation from Norway to Germany. Here prisoners repack their belongings after the interrogation and search processes.

Norway_After_Liberation_1945_BU9773

German prisoners of war at Elverum camp being processed prior to embarkation from Norway to Germany. Here prisoners prepare to move to the embarkation camp at Mandal.

Norway_After_Liberation_1945_BU9778

German prisoners of war from Elverum camp prepare for embarkation from Norway to Germany. Before leaving the embarkation camp at Mandal a final screening of prisoners was carried out by walking the prisoners past two Gestapo men and one ‘Quisling’ woman who were to identify any of their former colleagues trying to pass themselves off as ordinary German soldiers.

Norway_After_Liberation_BU6188

Ruth Anderson, the only Norwegian woman to work at the Gestapo HQ, under arrest and awaiting trial.

Norway_After_Liberation_1945_BU9779

German prisoners of war from Elverum camp prepare for embarkation from Norway to Germany. Here prisoners board boats at Mandal to take them to Germany.

Norway_After_Liberation_1945_BU9770

German prisoners of war at Elverum camp being processed prior to embarkation from Norway to Germany. Here a prisoner is frisked and a search made of all his possessions.

Norway_After_Liberation_1945_BU9781

German prisoners of war from Elverum camp prepare for embarkation from Norway to Germany. Here a boat loaded with prisoners prepares to embark from Mandal for Germany.

Norway_After_Liberation_1945_BU9763

Storeroom at Solar aerodrome, Stavanger, holding some of the estimated 30,000 rifles taken from German forces in Norway after their surrender.

Norway_After_Liberation_1945_BU9766

A collection of German military equipment including artillery pieces, searchlights, tanks and lorries at Solar aerodrome, Stavanger.

Norway_After_Liberation_1945_BU9764

A line of German 7.5cm anti-tank guns at Solar aerodrome, Stavanger.

Norway_After_Liberation_1945_BU9759A line of Messerschmitt Bf 110 night fighters at Solar aerodrome, Stavanger, Norway, 1945.

A line of Messerschmitt Bf 110 night fighters at Solar aerodrome, Stavanger, Norway, 1945.

Norway_After_Liberation,_1945_CL2918

An abandoned Blohm und Voss Bv 138 flying boat stands close to a pile of wreckage from German seaplanes at Tromso in northern Norway.

Norway_After_Liberation,_1945_CL2914

German prisoners of war assist a sergeant of a Royal Air Force Disarmament Wing make an inventory of aircraft spare parts at Kjeller airfield neat Oslo.

The_Royal_Air_Force_in_Norway_Following_the_Liberation,_1945_CL3285

Sergeant H E Hadley and Leading Aircraftman W J Ferris of the Royal Air Force Disarmament Wing prepare to burn a pile of German propaganda literature at an airfield near Stavanger.

The_Royal_Air_Force_in_Norway_Following_the_Liberation,_1945_CL3286

Sergeant H E Hadley and Leading Aircraftman W J Ferris of a Royal Air Force Disarmament Wing burn German propaganda literature at an airfield near Stavanger.

Norway_After_Liberation_1945_BU9761

An officer of a Highland regiment inspects a German Molch (Salamander) one-man submarine at Solar aerodrome, Stavanger, Norway.

Norway_After_Liberation_1945_BU9757

A German prisoner engaged in clearing a minefield near Stavanger fixes a fuse to a Teller mine. These mines were too dangerous to move and so were blown up where they were located.

Norway_After_Liberation_1945_BU9755

A German prisoner engaged in clearing a minefield near Stavanger probes for mines in a crater.

Norway_After_Liberation_1945_BU9752

A German prisoner engaged in mine clearance duties near Stavanger unearths an anti-personnel mine.

Norway_After_Liberation_1945_BU9758

The explosion caused from the detonation of German Teller mines during the clearing of a minefield near Stavanger.

Fanger og lokalbefolkning ved Falstad (1945) / Prisoners and local people at Falstad (1945)

Prisoners and local people by the main gate at Falstad prison camp (SS Strafgefangenenlager Falstad) shortly after Liberation in May 1945. From the left: Per Sæther, unknown woman, Ljuban Vukovic, Eldbjørg Augdal and a Soviet prisoner (Aleksandr Makeyev or Aleksey Pasnov)

Løslatte_falstadfanger_(1945)_-_Released_Falstad_prisoner_(1945)_(6729995799)

Two couples from Frol/Levanger, Ingeborg and Martin Sivertsen and Hilda and Olav Holberg, were in January 1945 arrested as hostages for their sons. They were imprisoned at Falstad until Liberation. This photo is taken at Ronglan railway station on May 8th 1945.

Credits: Imperial War Museum and Creative Commons License (Wikipedia)




Share.

About Author

Argunners Magazine is an independent online historian and collector's magazine, dedicated to the militaria and history of both Axis and Allied powers during the World War 1 & 2. Argunners is a central resource offering the latest militaria and war history news, journals, articles and press releases related to these themes.

7 Comments

    • Weaponds were used by the Norwegian army after the war. The mauser rifles got new barrels in 7.62×63 and were stamper “Hær” for the army, “FLY” for the airforce, “K.ART. for the marine and coastguard. The G33/40 Mausers were stamped “Politi” and used by the police. The police kept the original 7.92 barrel. Today these rifles are still used as hunting rifles, but I assume most of them just stands in the safe. Some collect them, but loose value and interest because they are rebuild.

Let us know what you think: