Carriere Suzanne“, Northern France, an abandoned World War 1 underground hospital established into a giant limestone quarry. One of the most beautiful places Marc Askat from 442 – Explorations has ever explored. Argunners Magazine presents Marc Askat’s photographical journey through “Carriere Suzanne”.

We’ve received an e-mail that gives a little more information on this underground hospital: “Col. Thompson, the British Doctor who set up the hospital in the caves at Arras, is the grand-father of a resident of Grampound in Cornwall UK.“, according to Liz F., Grampound with Creed Heritage Centre.

Finally I am able to announce where this is located.. The place is called “Carrieres de Montigny”. You can find their website here: http://lescarrieresdemontigny.fr/.

Abandoned World War 1 Underground Hospital

Carrieres de Montigny, abandoned underground hospital."Carriere Suzanne", Northern France, an abandoned WW1 underground hospital established into a giant limestone quarryCarrieres de Montigny, abandoned underground hospital."Carriere Suzanne", Northern France, an abandoned WW1 underground hospital established into a giant limestone quarry"Carriere Suzanne", Northern France, an abandoned WW1 underground hospital established into a giant limestone quarry"Carriere Suzanne", Northern France, an abandoned WW1 underground hospital established into a giant limestone quarry"Carriere Suzanne", Northern France, an abandoned WW1 underground hospital established into a giant limestone quarry"Carriere Suzanne", Northern France, an abandoned WW1 underground hospital established into a giant limestone quarry"Carriere Suzanne", Northern France, an abandoned WW1 underground hospital established into a giant limestone quarry"Carriere Suzanne", Northern France, an abandoned WW1 underground hospital established into a giant limestone quarry"Carriere Suzanne", Northern France, an abandoned WW1 underground hospital established into a giant limestone quarry"Carriere Suzanne", Northern France, an abandoned WW1 underground hospital established into a giant limestone quarry"Carriere Suzanne", Northern France, an abandoned WW1 underground hospital established into a giant limestone quarry"Carriere Suzanne", Northern France, an abandoned WW1 underground hospital established into a giant limestone quarry"Carriere Suzanne", Northern France, an abandoned WW1 underground hospital established into a giant limestone quarry"Carriere Suzanne", Northern France, an abandoned WW1 underground hospital established into a giant limestone quarry"Carriere Suzanne", Northern France, an abandoned WW1 underground hospital established into a giant limestone quarry"Carriere Suzanne", Northern France, an abandoned WW1 underground hospital established into a giant limestone quarryCarrieres de Montigny, abandoned underground hospital.Carrieres de Montigny, abandoned underground hospital.Carrieres de Montigny, abandoned underground hospital.Credits: Marc Askat (442 – Explorations). Do not copy, redistribute or republish these without permission.




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Argunners Magazine is an independent online historian and collector's magazine, dedicated to the militaria and history of both Axis and Allied powers during the World War 1 & 2. Argunners is a central resource offering the latest militaria and war history news, journals, articles and press releases related to these themes.

12 Comments

  1. Mrs Cynthia Stannard on

    Is it possible you could let me know when you open this place to the public please, i am very interested as my Great Uncle was killed at an underground hospital in northern France, but dont know where. I have seen to the one at Arras. I have also found his resting place at a cemetery in Arras

  2. Hi Neil and Lee, this was found by the end of the 90’s and the place is currently under renovation, that’s why we can’t reveal the location as the site is still open to all winds, and we need to pretect this place against degradations and stealing, hope you will understand, have a nice day and thanks for your comments 🙂 !

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